Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
NRSC 0050-301 Forensic Neuroscience Daniel Demitry Langleben GLAB 100 F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Progress in behavioral neuroscience and brain imaging techniques, such as functional and structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has forced the courts to reconsider the role of behavioral sciences in courtroom decision-making. The goal of this course is to enable students to understand and interpret the use of behaviorial neuro evidence in the justice system. The course will introduce the students to the relevant behavioral neuroscience constructs, principles of brain imaging and rules of scientific evidence. Students will be asked to use this introductory knowledge to critically evaluate the use of brain imaging and other behavioral neuroscience techniques as evidence in representative legal cases. For each case, students will serve as neuroscience experts for the defense or prosecution and prepare, present and defend their testimony against the opposing team. Through this course, students will develop the ability to critically evaluate brain imaging and other neuroscience data in forensic and legal settings. Living World Sector
NRSC 0090-301 Your Brain on Food Amber L Alhadeff GLAB 102 M 3:30 PM-6:29 PM What motivates us to eat? Why do many of us eat even in the absence of hunger? How do our food preferences and habits form? And how can eating transition from regulated to dysregulated? This seminar class investigates these questions and many others, with a focus on how our brains regulate food intake. We will explore the neuroscience behind eating, as well as the genetic, psychological, social, cultural, and societal influences that shape our behavior. Through readings, assignments, and class discussions, we will navigate the biological forces behind normal eating, as well as how eating becomes disordered in diseases like obesity and eating disorders. Through this course, students will learn about behavioral neuroscience research from human and animal studies and will develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. There are no prerequisites except for a love of food. Living World Sector https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NRSC0090301
NRSC 1110-401 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Emily R Hyatt
Nicole C Rust
LEVN AUD MWF 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110401, BIOL1110401, PSYC1210401, PSYC1210401 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-402 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Emily R Hyatt
Kyndall Nicholas
LLAB 104 T 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110402, BIOL1110402, PSYC1210402, PSYC1210402 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-403 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Emily R Hyatt
Sophie Rogers
LLAB 104 T 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110403, BIOL1110403, PSYC1210403, PSYC1210403 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-404 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Sierra Foshe
Emily R Hyatt
LLAB 104 T 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110404, BIOL1110404, PSYC1210404, PSYC1210404 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-405 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Emily R Hyatt
Michael D Murphy
LLAB 104 T 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110405, BIOL1110405, PSYC1210405, PSYC1210405 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-406 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Emily R Hyatt
Audrey Luo
LLAB 104 R 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110406, BIOL1110406, PSYC1210406, PSYC1210406 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-407 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Lindsay Ejoh
Emily R Hyatt
LLAB 104 R 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110407, BIOL1110407, PSYC1210407, PSYC1210407 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-408 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Emily R Hyatt
Julia Riley
LLAB 104 R 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110408, BIOL1110408, PSYC1210408, PSYC1210408 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-409 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Simon Bohn
Emily R Hyatt
LLAB 104 R 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110409, BIOL1110409, PSYC1210409, PSYC1210409 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-601 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Judith Mclean PSYL A30 MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110601, BIOL1110601, PSYC1210601, PSYC1210601 Living World Sector https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NRSC1110601
NRSC 1110-602 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Grace M Digiovanni LLAB 104 T 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110602, BIOL1110602, PSYC1210602, PSYC1210602 Living World Sector
NRSC 1110-603 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Jacob T Lewin LLAB 104 R 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system. We begin with the cellular basis of neuronal activities, then discuss the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behaviors to clinical disorders. BIOL1110603, BIOL1110603, PSYC1210603, PSYC1210603 Living World Sector
NRSC 1159-401 Memory Anna Schapiro
Dhairyya Singh
Marlie Tandoc
ARCH 208 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course presents an integrative treatment of the cognitive and neural processes involved in learning and memory, primarily in humans. We will survey the major findings and theories on how the brain gives rise to different kinds of memory, considering evidence from behavioral experiments, neuroscientific experiments, and computational models. PSYC1530401 Living World Sector
NRSC 1160-001 ABCS of Everyday Neuroscience Loretta Flanagan-Cato FAGN 116 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is an opportunity for undergraduates to share their interest and enthusiasm for neuroscience with students in grades 9-12 attending urban public schools in West Philadelphia. The course will allow Penn students to develop their science communication and teaching skills. Students will prepare neuroscience demonstrations, hands-on activities, and assessment tools. In parallel, the course aims to engage local high school students, increasing their interest and knowledge in science, and ultimately promoting lifelong science literacy. Perm Needed From Instructor
NRSC 2110-401 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Michael Kaplan
Marc F Schmidt
LEVN AUD MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Cellular physiology of neurons and excitable cells; molecular neurobiology and development. Topics include: action potential generation; synaptic transmission; molecular and physiological studies of ion channels; second messengers; simple neural circuits; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory; and neural development. BIOL2110401
NRSC 2110-402 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Michael Kaplan GLAB 102 W 7:00 PM-8:29 PM Cellular physiology of neurons and excitable cells; molecular neurobiology and development. Topics include: action potential generation; synaptic transmission; molecular and physiological studies of ion channels; second messengers; simple neural circuits; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory; and neural development. BIOL2110402
NRSC 2110-403 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Michael Kaplan GLAB 102 R 8:30 AM-9:59 AM Cellular physiology of neurons and excitable cells; molecular neurobiology and development. Topics include: action potential generation; synaptic transmission; molecular and physiological studies of ion channels; second messengers; simple neural circuits; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory; and neural development. BIOL2110403
NRSC 2110-404 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Michael Kaplan GLAB 102 R 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Cellular physiology of neurons and excitable cells; molecular neurobiology and development. Topics include: action potential generation; synaptic transmission; molecular and physiological studies of ion channels; second messengers; simple neural circuits; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory; and neural development. BIOL2110404
NRSC 2110-405 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Michael Kaplan GLAB 102 R 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Cellular physiology of neurons and excitable cells; molecular neurobiology and development. Topics include: action potential generation; synaptic transmission; molecular and physiological studies of ion channels; second messengers; simple neural circuits; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory; and neural development. BIOL2110405
NRSC 2110-406 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Michael Kaplan GLAB 102 F 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Cellular physiology of neurons and excitable cells; molecular neurobiology and development. Topics include: action potential generation; synaptic transmission; molecular and physiological studies of ion channels; second messengers; simple neural circuits; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory; and neural development. BIOL2110406
NRSC 2110-407 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Michael Kaplan GLAB 102 F 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Cellular physiology of neurons and excitable cells; molecular neurobiology and development. Topics include: action potential generation; synaptic transmission; molecular and physiological studies of ion channels; second messengers; simple neural circuits; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory; and neural development. BIOL2110407
NRSC 2110-408 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Michael Kaplan GLAB 102 F 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Cellular physiology of neurons and excitable cells; molecular neurobiology and development. Topics include: action potential generation; synaptic transmission; molecular and physiological studies of ion channels; second messengers; simple neural circuits; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory; and neural development. BIOL2110408
NRSC 2140-401 Evolution of Behavior: Animal Behavior Ana I Alonso
Yun Ding
Marcelina Martynek
Marc F Schmidt
LEVN AUD TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The evolution of behavior in animals will be explored using basic genetic and evolutionary principles. Lectures will highlight behavioral principles using a wide range of animal species, both vertebrate and invertebrate. Examples of behavior include the complex economic decisions related to foraging, migratory birds using geomagnetic fields to find breeding grounds, and the decision individuals make to live in groups. Group living has led to the evolution of social behavior and much of the course will focus on group formation, cooperation among kin, mating systems, territoriality and communication. BIOL2140401, PSYC2220401
NRSC 2140-402 Evolution of Behavior: Animal Behavior Ana I Alonso
Marcelina Martynek
LEVN AUD T 7:00 PM-7:59 PM The evolution of behavior in animals will be explored using basic genetic and evolutionary principles. Lectures will highlight behavioral principles using a wide range of animal species, both vertebrate and invertebrate. Examples of behavior include the complex economic decisions related to foraging, migratory birds using geomagnetic fields to find breeding grounds, and the decision individuals make to live in groups. Group living has led to the evolution of social behavior and much of the course will focus on group formation, cooperation among kin, mating systems, territoriality and communication. BIOL2140402, PSYC2220402
NRSC 2140-403 Evolution of Behavior: Animal Behavior Ana I Alonso
Marcelina Martynek
LLAB 109 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM The evolution of behavior in animals will be explored using basic genetic and evolutionary principles. Lectures will highlight behavioral principles using a wide range of animal species, both vertebrate and invertebrate. Examples of behavior include the complex economic decisions related to foraging, migratory birds using geomagnetic fields to find breeding grounds, and the decision individuals make to live in groups. Group living has led to the evolution of social behavior and much of the course will focus on group formation, cooperation among kin, mating systems, territoriality and communication. BIOL2140403, PSYC2220403
NRSC 2249-401 Cognitive Neuroscience Sam Lyons
Allyson P Mackey
Cassidy Mcdermott
COLL 200 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The study of the neural systems that underlie human perception, memory and language; and of the pathological syndromes that result from damage to these systems. PSYC1230401, PSYC1230401 Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
NRSC 2270-401 Drugs, Brain and Mind Michael Kane LEVN AUD TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM The course will begin with a review of basic concepts in pharmacology including: routes of drug administration, drug metabolism, the dose response curve, tolerance and sensitization. Following a brief overview of cellular foundations of neuropharmacology (neuronal biology, synaptic and receptor function), the course will focus on several neurotransmitter systems and the molecular and behavioral mechanisms mediating the mind-altering, additive and neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia and anxiety with an emphasis on their underlying neurobiological causes, as well as the pharmacological approaches for treatment. PSYC2250401 Natural Sciences & Mathematics Sector
NRSC 3310-101 Laboratory in the Structure of the Nervous System Judith Mclean LLAB 104 W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM A laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental gross and histological organization of the brain. The mammalian brain will be dissected and its microscopic anatomy examined using standard slide sets. Comparative brain material will be introduced, where appropriate, to demonstrate basic structural-functional correlations. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NRSC3310101
NRSC 3999-001 Independent Research Individual research of an experimental nature with a member of the standing faculty leading to a written paper. The grade is based primarily on a serious term paper describing original research carried out by the student. Students must submit a proposal prior to registering. During the semester, students must attend two seminars to discuss planning and independent research project, ethical concerns in research and writing a scientific paper. Attendance at the meetings is mandatory. Students doing more than one credit of independent study will be required to present a poster at the annual BBB Symposium. Perm Needed From Department
NRSC 4233-401 Seminar in Cognitive Neuroscience: Brain Development Michael Arcaro GLAB 102 T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This discussion-based seminar will focus on the neural bases of cognitive development.
Each week the class will discuss a selection of papers that consider the roles of genes and environment on topics including the development of perceptual abilities, language, and cognition. The course will cover several aspects of pre- and postnatal brain and behavioral development with particular emphasis on animal models. This course is intended for students interested in neurobiology, cognitive psychology, evolutionary psychology and development.
PSYC3233401
NRSC 4266-401 Molecular Genetics of Neurological Disease Nancy Bonini FAGN 214 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course will focus on the molecular basis of neurological diseases, exploring in detail key papers that cover topics including defining the disease genes, development of animal models that provide mechanistic insight, and seminal findings that reveal molecular understanding. Diseases covered will include neurological diseases of great focus today such as Alzheimer's, Fragile-X and autism, dementia, motor neuron degeneration, and microsatellite repeat expansion disorders. The course will provide a perspective from initial molecular determination through current status. Students will gain an understanding of how the molecular basis of a disease is discovered (from classical genetics to modern genomics) and how such diseases can be modeled in simple genetic systems for mechanistic insight. The course will be comprised of lectures with detailed analysis of primary literature and in-class activities. Grading will be based on class participation, exams, and written papers. Biology 2210 is a pre-requisite. Seniors are prioritized for the course BIOL4266401
NRSC 4433-301 Neural Basis of Auditory Perception and Cognition Judith Mclean WILL 29 T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This seminar will focus on the neural basis of auditory perception and cognition. We will examine auditory processing in animal ‘specialists’ to understand how sounds are processed in parallel pathways for identification and localization. We will also examine auditory cortical mechanisms for cognitive functions including attention, decision making, speech comprehension, and working memory. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of primary literature. Students will be required to orally present journal articles from the primary literature, participate in the article discussions, write peer-reviews, and write a final “News and Views”-style paper. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NRSC4433301
NRSC 4442-401 Neurobiology of Learning and Memory Mary Ellen Kelly LLAB 109 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course focuses on the current state of our knowledge about the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. A combination of lectures and student seminars will explore the molecular and cellular basis of learning in invertebrates and vertebrates from a behavioral and neural perspective. BIOL4142401, PSYC3301401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NRSC4442401
NRSC 4450-301 Music and the brain: the new and old science of music Michael Kaplan GLAB 100 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM In a world where humans can't seem to agree on much of anything, there is one thing that still unites us: we love music. Why should abstract sequences of sounds give us such strong emotional reactions? Why indeed should they give us any emotional reaction at all? On every continent, today and throughout history, there is not a single human culture that has ever been described that does not make music. Within cultures, music is so ubiquitous that we actually have clinical terms (amusia and musical anhedonia) to describe people who don't understand or don't enjoy music. And yet, despite this ubiquity, the evolutionary origin and purpose of music remains unknown. Not only do people everywhere make music - they do so in fundamentally similar ways. All over the world people divide rhythm into twos and threes; all over the world people divide the frequency spectrum logarithmically, in octaves; with a very few exceptions, we divide octaves into no more than 12 steps, and we use subsets of 5-7 of these tones at a time. Not only that, but many cultures seem to have independently arrived at the same sets of 5-7 notes. These are probably not coincidences. If not coincidence, then what? In this course we look for explanations to these and other questions about music by looking at something that humans all over the globe have in common: the brain. Using readings from the primary literature and classic texts, supplemented with software exercises and analysis, we will see how many of the age-old mysteries and questions of music can be either answered or in some cases amplified by a consideration of brain mechanisms. Thinking about music in the context of brain function also provides a biological and evolutionary rationale not just for why music is the way it is, but why it should exist at all. More broadly, this course is an example of what can (and cannot) be accomplished by addressing aesthetic and philosophical questions as scientific and empirical ones. Prerequisite: BIBB 109 and prior musical instruction, any instrument Perm Needed From Instructor
NRSC 4469-301 Stress Neuroscience Jennifer N Heerding COLL 315A T 12:00 PM-2:59 PM Stress can be caused by a variety of conditions, ranging from low-level noise in the workplace to life-threatening situations and these stressors can cause changes in the physiology and behavior of individuals. This course will examine the neural mechanisms underlying physiological and emotional responses to stress in a journal club format. Topics to be covered include anxiety disorders, depression and other mood disorders, the differential effects of stress on males and females, the physiological effects of stress on the immune system and feeding behavior, the effects of maternal stress on offspring as well as strategies to mitigate the effects of stress. Perm Needed From Department https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NRSC4469301
NRSC 4470-301 Animal Models of Neuropsychiatric Disorders Michael Kane FAGN 103 R 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This seminar will focus on the significant role of animal models in the investigation of the pathophysiology of a variety of human neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in the development of treatments for these disorders. The course will focus on the use of genetically modified mice in the investigation of Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD), anxiety and affective disorders, schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), with an emphasis on the limitations of such models. Class time will consist of short lectures and open discussions via student-led presentations. Emphasis will be placed on the critical analysis of primary literature.